Wednesday, January 23, 2008

CT: Interview with Sen. Obama

[I've not really commented much on the primaries. Mainly because this blog isn't primarily about politics. This interview with Sen. Obama appeared in a web-only special today at Christianity Today, and falls within the purview of this blog.]
I am a Christian, and I am a devout Christian. I believe in the redemptive death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. I believe that that faith gives me a path to be cleansed of sin and have eternal life. But most importantly, I believe in the example that Jesus set by feeding the hungry and healing the sick and always prioritizing the least of these over the powerful. I didn't 'fall out in church' as they say, but there was a very strong awakening in me of the importance of these issues in my life. I didn't want to walk alone on this journey. Accepting Jesus Christ in my life has been a powerful guide for my conduct and my values and my ideals.
On abortion, he says he's not pro-abortion, wants to reduce the number of abortions, promote a greater respect for sex, even have restrictions on late-term abortions. However:
Ultimately, women are in the best position to make a decision at the end of the day about these issues. With significant constraints. For example, I think we can legitimately say — the state can legitimately say — that we are prohibiting late-term abortions as long as there's an exception for the mother's health. Those provisions that I voted against typically didn't have those exceptions, which raises profound questions where you might have a mother at great risk. Those are issues that I don't think the government can unilaterally make a decision about. I think they need to be made in consultation with doctors, they have to be prayed upon, or people have to be consulting their conscience on it. I think we have to keep that decision-making with the person themselves.
Even those vague and unspecified "significant constraints" would be better than the on-demand regime that we have today.

3 comments:

Zadok the Roman said...

. I believe that that faith gives me a path to be cleansed of sin and have eternal life. But most importantly, I believe in the example that Jesus set by feeding the hungry and healing the sick and always prioritizing the least of these over the powerful.

That's basically a form of Pelagianism.

Gashwin said...

Hmm. I hadn't thought of that. In a sense, though, I suspect that is reflective of the strong "social Gospel" undercurrent that characterizes much liberal Protestantism (and Catholicism too). Obama is a member of the United Church of Christ.

I see your point though, especially when one emphasizes that clause: good works are more important than faith in Christ.

pritcher said...

Like Benedict writes in Spe Salvi. (par. 25), to work for justice is necessary but not sufficient. Brings to mind Mt 6:33--seek first the kingdom of God. Not build first the kingdom.