Tuesday, March 07, 2006

Diocese of Mizoram sends missionaries to Wales ...

That's in India and [I think] refers to the Anglican/CNI Diocese. [Via Zadok.]
Indian tribes who were converted to Christianity by missionaries from Wales are now returning to evangelise the Welsh because they believe that the country is in a state of religious decline.

The Diocese of Mizoram, in the north-east of India, has already sent one missionary to south Wales. It is planning to send a second in April, to help the Welsh Presbyterian Church with its shortage of ministers.

[snip]

Mr Sangkhuma said that the Church in Wales had been "decimated" and that he still advocated wayside preaching and knocking on doors as a form of evangelism in the area.
. Very New Testament, eh? :-) Mizoram is right next to Nagaland, which was the focus of this recent CT story: "The Baptist soul hunters of Central Asia." Does the Catholic Church in India talk in such pointed and explicit terms about evangelization anymore? Or, both in the light of the Council, and the issues surrounding the sensitive nature of "conversion," is the picture more complex?

3 comments:

chez said...

interesting!. I had read the other article on CT earlier( i subscribe). what can i say abt the catholic church...

Gashwin said...

... so ... what is the attitude towards evangelization in India? I've gotten very different perspectives from Indian Catholics I know ... like a lot of the Jesuits I know simply operate as if the Council changed the mandate from proclamation to dialogue ... what's your experience been like?

chez said...

my impression is we are completely on the backfoot. The accusation by the sanghis that we have a "motive" behind all our work seems to have really hit us hard.

Yes, you have gathered well. Evangelization has been forgotten completely and the task is very well being carried out by the nondenominational "born again"s and protestants.

I have a big crib list, but ...I'd like to ask myself what I've done for the cause before pointing a finger at the clergy.